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Leonard E Parker

Center for Gravitation, Cosmology & Astrophysics

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Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics

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LIGO Nanograv E@H ARCC RNS

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Acknowledgement

The Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics is supported by NASA, the National Science Foundation, UW-Milwaukee College of Letters and Science, and UW-Milwaukee Graduate School. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of these organizations.

Research Overview

Research at the Center addresses problems in relativistic astrophysics, numerical relativity, gravitational-wave astronomy, cosmic-ray astrophysics, cosmology, neutrino astronomy, quantum fields in curved space-time, and quantum gravity.

Members of the Center play important roles in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) Collaboration, an ambitious project to detect and study gravitational waves from astrophysical objects such as black holes and supernovae. UW-Milwaukee hosts a state of the art data center specifically designed and constructed for the analysis of data from LIGO and other astronomical observatories.

The group also collaborates with the Pierre Auger Observatory which was constructed to study ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, the most energetic and rarest of particles in the universe. The origin of these particles remains a tantalizing mystery.

The Center for Gravitation and Cosmology is committed to furthering science education and public outreach through several programs. One of them is the Arecibo Remote Control Center at UWM, a group of students and teachers that participates in state-of-the-art research, searching for new pulsars remotely using the world's largest radio telescope.

Another program that was developed at the Center, and that involves the participation of the public, is Einstein@Home. Volunteers from all around the world sign up their computers to process data from gravitational wave detectors. In this way, people from all around the world can get involved in cutting-edge research.


UWM Center for Gravitation and Cosmology | http://www.gravity.phys.uwm.edu/ | contact@gravity.phys.uwm.edu