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Leonard E Parker

Center for Gravitation, Cosmology & Astrophysics

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Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics

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Acknowledgement

The Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics is supported by NASA, the National Science Foundation, UW-Milwaukee College of Letters and Science, and UW-Milwaukee Graduate School. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of these organizations.

LIGO Discovers First Merger of Two Neutron Stars Seen By Astronomers Around the World

Posted by DK on October 16, 2017

The LIGO/Virgo collaboration announced the discovery of a neutron-star neutron star merger detected in gravitational waves. It ws subsequently detected across the electromagnetic spectrum by astronomers around the world.

On August 17, 2017 the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected the merger of two neutron stars. Only 2s later the Fermi Gamma-ray satellite detected a burst of gamma-rays coming from the same direction on the sky. Within a day a new optical source had been detected in the galaxy NGC 4993, about 130 million light years away. It has subsequently been seen by ultraviolet, radio, infrared, and X-ray telescopes on all 7 continents and in space. This continues to be a fascinating event.

Multi-messenger
										   detection
										   of
										   GW170817
The detection of electromagnetic radiation from the GW170817 neutron star merger in ultra-violet, infrared and radio conducted by the GROWTH team. Observations were made using the Swift satellite (UV), Gemini-South Telescope (infrared) and the Very Large Array (radio). Credit: Robert Hurt (Caltech/IPAC), Mansi Kasliwal (Caltech), Gregg Hallinan (Caltech), Phil Evans (NASA) and the GROWTH collaboration
For more information see:

UWM Report article

GROWTH collaboration article


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