CGCA Logo

Leonard E Parker

Center for Gravitation, Cosmology & Astrophysics

UWM Logo
Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics

Follow us on:

Projects:

LIGO Nanograv E@H ARCC RNS

Make a Gift

Thank you for considering a gift to the Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics. Your gift of any size makes a difference. Make a Gift Online.

Get Involved

There are many ways to participate in the life of the Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics. Please get involved, learn more about our fascinating Universe, and meet our members. Get involved!

Acknowledgement

The Leonard E Parker Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics is supported by NASA, the National Science Foundation, UW-Milwaukee College of Letters and Science, and UW-Milwaukee Graduate School. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of these organizations.

WIYN keeping an eye on comet ISON

Posted by Laura Nuttall on February 18, 2014


Comet ISON made an appearance in our skies during 2013 as it hurtled through our solar system, passing extremely close the Sun. Ralf Kotulla, a postdoctoral research associate within the CGCA, spent a little time during a joint UW-Milwaukee/UW-Madison observing run on the WIYN telescope to take advantage of this passing comet and captured beautiful images, one of which is now a finalist in the NSFs comet ISON photo contest (vote for Ralf's entry).

This image shows the comet in the constellation of LEO as it moves through the solar system. The data for this image were obtained in the morning hours of an observing run on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope lead by graduate students of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Wisconsin.

The bright, unresolved nucleus of the comet as well as its diffuse, blueish coma and long tail are easily visible. As the telescope was following the comets movement relative the the background star-field, stars became elongated, and repeated observations with different filters created a caleidoscope of colors. Two satellites crossed the path of the comet during the exposure and are visible as green and red streaks, adding to the starry firework.

More information about the competition and other entries.


UWM Center for Gravitation and Cosmology | http://www.gravity.phys.uwm.edu/ | contact@gravity.phys.uwm.edu